Dusting Off the Old Ones (20)

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(Created page with "'''20. The Deadwood Stage Coach''' The Stage Coach at the Range Riders Museum is an item of great interest to hundreds of tourists who stop at the Museum every summer. A litt...")
 
 
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'''20. The Deadwood Stage Coach'''
 
'''20. The Deadwood Stage Coach'''
  
The Stage Coach at the Range Riders Museum is an item of great interest to hundreds of tourists who stop at the Museum every summer. A little history of this early day transportation should be of interest to all local residents. As near as can be recalled, the coach was purchased from a resident of Fergus County after the coming of the Milwaukee into Montana. This coach stood for many years at the west end of the Milwaukee Passenger Depot platform, and when the Museum was built, it was moved there and a shelter built for it. If this stage coach is not one of the coaches that was used between Miles City and Deadwood in the seventies, it is a replica of those used on that route. And those Deadwood stage coaches are probably the most publicized means of transportation of the early days. This results from their being made the subject of many western stories and pictures. With the great lumbering coaches filled with passengers and baggage carried both fore and aft, the pictures have made these coaches to wild west drama what the elephant is to a circus. The route from Miles City to Deadwood ran through Powderville and Stoneville, which is the present site of Alzada.
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The Stage Coach at the Range Riders Museum is an item of great interest to hundreds of tourists who stop at the Museum every summer. A little history of this early day transportation should be of interest to all local residents. As near as can be recalled, the coach was purchased from a resident of Fergus County after the coming of the Milwaukee into Montana. This coach stood for many years at the west end of the Milwaukee Passenger Depot platform, and when the Museum was built, it was moved there and a shelter built for it. If this stage coach is not one of the coaches that was used between Miles City and Deadwood in the seventies, it is a replica of those used on that route. And those [[Western Stage Line|Deadwood stage]] coaches are probably the most publicized means of transportation of the early days. This results from their being made the subject of many western stories and pictures. With the great lumbering coaches filled with passengers and baggage carried both fore and aft, the pictures have made these coaches to wild west drama what the elephant is to a circus. The route from Miles City to Deadwood ran through Powderville and Stoneville, which is the present site of Alzada.

Latest revision as of 22:52, 19 May 2014

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